Pre & Postnatal Activity

Pre & Postnatal Activity

The more active and fit you are during pregnancy, the easier it will be for you to adapt to your changing shape and weight gain. It will also help you to cope with labour and get back into shape after the birth. Keep up your normal daily physical activity or exercise (sport, running, yoga, dancing, or even walking to the shops and back) for as long as you feel comfortable.

Exercise is not dangerous for your baby. There is some evidence that active women are less likely to experience problems in later pregnancy and labour.

Exercise tips for pregnancy

Do not exhaust yourself. You may need to slow down as your pregnancy progresses or if your maternity team advises you to. If in doubt, consult your maternity team.

As a general rule, you should be able to hold a conversation as you exercise when pregnant. If you become breathless as you talk, then you’re probably exercising too strenuously. 

Yoga for Pregnancy

Yoga for Pregnancy can have all sorts of benefits. Whether you’re a fitness fan or are new to exercise classes and yoga, our gentle yoga sessions can help you get your body ready for birth.

Whatever your fitness level, Yoga for Pregnancy is a great way to relax and spend time with your unborn baby. Learn breathing techniques, practise birthing poses and connect with your changing body. You’ll meet other mums and get plenty of practical tips – and you’ll feel more positive and relaxed about birth, too. 

Exercising with Your Baby

Even though it may be the last thing on your mind, there are lots of ways to keep active after your little one arrives either on your own, in a group or an organised class.

Lots of postnatal classes let you exercise with your baby at your side. Some include your baby and their pram or buggy as part of the workout. Your Health Visitor may know of some local ones.

Exercise After Birth

If you had a straightforward birth, you can start gentle exercise as soon as you feel up to it. This could include walking, gentle stretches, pelvic floor and tummy exercises. It’s usually a good idea to wait until after your 6-week postnatal check before you start any high-impact exercise, such as aerobics or running.

If you exercised regularly before giving birth and you feel fit and well, you may be able to start earlier. Talk to your midwife, health visitor or GP.

If you had a more complicated delivery or a caesarean, your recovery time will be longer. Talk to your midwife, health visitor or GP before starting anything strenuous.

This Girl Can

Even though it may be the last thing on your mind, there are lots of ways to keep active after your little one arrives either on your own, in a group or an organised class.

It might seem counterproductive in those early months of sleep deprivation, but keeping active and getting outside is as important for you as your baby. Like any types of keeping active the benefits are:
• Improved heart and lung function
• Muscle toning and increased stamina and energy
• Reduced tension, anxiety and depression, and better sleep patterns (eventually!)